Ulster Tatler - December 2009

Ulster Tatler - December 2009

Chic new restaurant, Bastille, has introduced the irresistible flavours of France to Belfast with its recent opening on the city’s über-trendy Lisburn Road.

Bastille will delight diners with authentic French cuisine served in an intimate and romantic setting - true Parisian style with all the warmth of the French Riviera.

Open 7 days a week, Bastille boasts a mouth watering menu emphasising simple and classic French cuisine with a modern twist.

Ulster Life - November/December 2009

Ulster Life - November/December 2009

Chic new restaurant, Bastille, has introduced the irresistible flavours of France to Belfast with its recent opening on the city’s über-trendy Lisburn Road.

Bastille will delight diners with authentic French cuisine served in an intimate and romantic setting - true Parisian style with all the warmth of the French Riviera.

Open 7 days a week, Bastille boasts a mouth watering menu emphasising simple and classic French cuisine with a modern twist.

Hospitality Review - March 2010

Hospitality Review - March 2010

Belfast’s Bastille is a far cry indeed from the dreaded Paris prison where Dickens’ unlikely hero, Sydney Carton languished and, finally, found redemption. Yet, as Emma Cowan discovered, the chic French brasserie on the Lisburn Road has its own ‘Tale of Two Cities’...

Now, he’s very French was the forewarning I was given by the PR company that initially pointed me in the direction of Bastille, the recent and most welcome French addition to the Belfast restaurant scene. I do speak French – rustily – but I really require generous alcoholic lubricant in order to be comfortable, so I was a little apprehensive.

 

I needn’t have worried for, as soon as I met Guilliaume Rabillat I realised that he was, in fact, an old acquaintance and French, yes, indeed, but French via Derry city! I first met Guillaume under the auspices of the Northern Ireland Association of Chefs and Cooks, for he is a pastry chef par excellence and I well remembered his utterly fascinating workshop on the art of the chocolatier. The French accent is strong, but it has a Derry lilt to it that makes for complete ease of understanding.

Belfast Telegraph - December 2009

Belfast Telegraph - December 2009

When you go on your holidays abroad, no matter how short haul, you have an idea in your mind that you are travelling a million miles from home.

Malaga or Maldives, it doesn’t matter. Once you’re in international airspace, distance doesn’t matter. As soon as you step on that plane, that’s it, you’ve left the old country and the miseries and drudgery of daily life are instant history. For some really desperate headcases who loathe their normal existence, a foreign holiday is not just a chance to drop tools for a couple of weeks — it means a new identity can be assumed.

I’ve seen guys from north Belfast at the bar in Aldergrove transformed three hours later into hedge fund managers, brain surgeons and international soccer agents by the time they’ve ordered their second cerveza in the beach bar at Magaluf. There are good reasons for this change of identity. For one thing, it’s easy because you’re abroad and nobody knows you. For another, it helps your pulling power if you replace your profession as a chicken sexer at Moy Park with something a bit more glamorous like, say, Beyonce’s European tour head of security.